INDEPENDENCE HALL   |   BARRINGTON LIVING HISTORY FARM   |   STAR OF THE REPUBLIC MUSEUM    |   FANTHORP INN

“Barrington” is named after his birthplace, Great Barrington Massachusetts. The Farm’s occupants included Jones, his wife Mary, their four children, his sister, Mary’s half-siblings, and six slaves.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Photo credit: Ed Erwin

Barrington Living History Farm

Barrington Living History Farm is a representation of the farm founded by Dr. Anson Jones, last President of the Republic of Texas. With Jones' daybook and accounts as their guide, the interpreters at Barrington Living History Farm conduct themselves much as did the earliest residents of the original farmstead, raising cotton, corn, cattle and hogs. Visitors take a step into the lives of Barrington’s earliest residents and participate in daily activities to better understand what life was like over 150 years ago.

Anson Jones called Barrington home from 1845 until his death in 1858. Jones arrived in Texas in 1833, settling first in Brazoria where he practiced medicine and became involved in politics. He actively served the Republic of Texas as a congressman, Minister to the United States, Senator, and Secretary of State. In 1844, at the height of his political career, Dr. Jones became president of the Republic. “Barrington” is named after his birthplace, Great Barrington Massachusetts. The Farm’s occupants included Jones, his wife Mary, their four children, his sister, Mary’s half-siblings, and six slaves.

The Anson Jones Home is an original structure built in 1844, near Washington. It was moved to Washington-on-the-Brazos State Historical Site as part of the Texas Centennial Celebration in 1936.

The outbuildings were recreated based on typical Texas architecture of the mid nineteenth century, and information found in Dr. Jones’ diaries and account books. The reconstructed farmstead opened as Barrington Living History Farm in March of 2000. It represents the lifestyle of the Jones family and the slaves who lived and worked here.

You are encouraged to participate in the work of the farm and become a part of the exhibit. Learn how to drive oxen, help plant and harvest crops, and try your hand at spinning or making soap. Explore the farm and experience the daily lives of those who came before.

Barrington Farm is now open daily from 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

FOR MORE INFORMATON: www.tpwd.state.tx.us/spdest/findadest/parks/barrington_farm